Hemp Flax Cinnamon Raisin Breakfast Muffins

I have been totally uninspired by breakfast in the last few weeks. I know how tough it can be to motivate yourself into eating something healthy that will give you enough fuel for a busy morning. I’ve been reaching for less than desirable choices – quick and easy things, more processed than I would normally go for, basically not nourishing or good for my body.

It has been a crazy few weeks in clinic (I know, no excuse right?!), and with next week set to be the same, I wanted to make sure I had something high in protein, low in refined sugar, wheat free, but still satisfying for my spleen (and the eye!!)… so I put my thinking cap on and came up with some yummy hemp, flax, cinnamon and raisin breakfast muffins. It has the comforting taste of cinnamon-raisin, but with an added earthy-nutty flavour!

For those of you on Facebook that have been requesting the recipe, here it is:

Ingredients:

1 cup of almond milk / soya milk / rice milk / water (whatever your preference)

1 tablespoon of finely milled flaxseed

1/4 cup of oil (again, your preference, but go for plain tasting – coconut, sunflower, etc)

1/4 cup of maple syrup

1/4 cup of ground almonds

1 & 1/4 cups of rice flour

2 & 1/2 teaspoons of cinnamon (I LOVE cinnamon – reduce if you only want a hint of it!)

1 teaspoon of baking powder (entirely optional, but as this recipe does not contain eggs, without the raising agent, the muffins can be quite dense – but still delicious!)

1 cup of shelled hemp

1/3 cup of raisins

.

Method:

1. Pre-heat the oven to 180 degrees C, and line a muffin tin with cases (or grease the tin to save pennies!)

2. Whisk the “milk” with the flaxseed, oil and maple syrup – it should get frothy and bigger in size.

3. Mix the dry ingredients together in a separate bowl – rice flour, ground almonds, cinnamon and baking powder if using – sift if necessary.

4. Add wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Mix together.

5. Fold in the raisins and shelled hemp until everything is combined.

6. Spoon carefully into the cases (ensuring each muffin has enough raisins!) and bake for around 20 mins. Check they are done in the middle with a toothpick or knife – but remember the rice flour will make them more crumbly than regular wheat flour, so a crumb or two on the toothpick is usually ok!

Now usually, I do a lot of thinking around Chinese Food Energetics for my healthy baking recipes, but for this one it wasn’t so much to do with the energetics of the individual ingredients (though raisins, flax and hemp all nourish Yin – making this recipe particularly good for anyone who suffers exhaustion, hot flushes, migraines etc), it was more to do with nourishing the Stomach and Spleen effectively at the best time for them. I spoke about the importance of supporting the digestive system at the appropriate time in the Chinese Clock in the video of my Apple and Pumpkin breakfast loaf back in the Autumn, but to recap, the Stomach time of day is between 7am and 9am, and the Spleen time of day is between 9am and 11 am. Eating nutritious, high protein and “energetically sweet” food (not refined sugar junk!) during this time is the best way to ensure your body gets the most superior energy.

This is because these organs work best during their allocated time of day on the Chinese Clock – put the best stuff in during this time, and you will get the best stuff out! Plus, the digestive system is associated with the Earth element in Chinese Medicine, and the taste this element and its organs REALLY love is “sweet”… so having “energetically sweet” foods will really give them a boost to work even more efficiently and effectively – lucky for us, raisins, flax, hemp, rice and cinnamon are ALL energetically sweet, giving us sweetness, but without the sugar!

If you enjoyed this recipe, then tell me in the comments section below, or why not share a photo on my Facebook page, or tweet me @RG_Acupuncture on my Twitter feed – I would LOVE to know how you got on, and if you love them as much as I do! And if you do like them, then please share this post and the recipe by hitting the various social media SHARE buttons below. If you want to know more about Chinese Food Energetics and how dietary advice could help you, please click here or visit the website. And don’t forget to feed your Qi!

.

© Rhiannon Griffiths 2012

Visit the website

Like on Facebook

Follow on Twitter

.

Yin and Yang 101

In clinic I talk about Yin and Yang a LOT. Whether it be because I am talking to a menopausal woman about needing to replenish all the cooling, moisturising, nourishing Yin energy in her body to help hot flushes, or whether I am explaining how we see migraines occurring when the hot, loud, strong Yang energy rushes up to the head, Yin and Yang are key. They are the basis of diagnosis and treatment in the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) form of acupuncture, as opposed to the Five Element side of things, which is, unsurprisingly, the remit of the Five Element style of acupuncture – I am lucky as an integrated practitioner, I truly get the best of both worlds!

.

.

So, as I like to try and at least pretend I am not some old hippy sprouting out groovy, psychedelic mantras about yin and yang, I thought I would share the basic differences between the two types of energy, so you can get a feel of where we acupuncturists come from when we see this energy manifesting in the bodies of our patients, but also in the outside world.

.

YIN

.

YANG

.

We each have our own balances of Yin and Yang in the body, and this will change according to the time of day, the season, our emotional state, or any illness we are suffering… the key is to ensure that despite the fluctuations in Yin and Yang at different times, we maintain some balance that bares resemblance to Yin and Yang in nature and the universe around us. This is what maintains health.

For example, at night time Yang should be receding and the Yin energy coming to the fore, as night time is Yin time; symptoms like hot flushes at night or insomnia where you cannot fall asleep, or you keep waking throughout the night, suggest that there is a lack of the Yin energy during a time where it should be abundant. And vice versa, during the day we should be alive, energised, happy and moving – if we feel tired, as though our limbs are heavy, everything is an effort and we need to sleep during Yang time, it indicates we are deficient in Yang energy to get us going. Acupuncture can help restore this balance, and help symptoms, by working with the levels and relationship of Yin and Yang in the body.

If you want to know more about Yin and Yang, or feel that they may be out of balance in your body (and / or emotions), contact me today, or leave a comment below – Yin and Yang, it’s not just for old hippies!

.

© Rhiannon Griffiths 2012

Visit the website

Like on Facebook

Follow on Twitter

.